Fix: High CPU Usage By Windows Module Installer Worker

Windows Module Installer Worker HIGH CPU

If your computer starts hanging or freezing, the first approach should be opening the Task Manager and checking the CPU usage. If it is high, note the process causing it and troubleshoot accordingly. If the high CPU usage was caused by the Windows Module Installer Worker process, this article might be helpful for you.

What is the Windows Module Installer Worker?

The Windows Module Installer Worker process enables installation, modification, and removal of Windows update components. The file associated with the Windows Module Installer Worker process is TiWorker.exe. If you kill this process in the Task Manager, you will not be able to update Windows.

Why would the Windows Module Installer Worker cause high CPU usage?

The Windows Module Installer Worker is a system process. Whenever you try to update Windows, the components are modified and that triggers the Windows Module Installer Worker process. Since it is a system process, we do not have any permanent resolution to the problem. However, a few workarounds could help.

Should we disable the Windows Module Installer Worker process?

If you kill the Windows Module Installer Worker process from the Task Manager, it would re-initiate when the system is rebooted. Disabling the process permanently is not recommended.

Fix High CPU Usage By Windows Module Installer Worker

1. Disable the Windows Module Installer Worker process

We could disable the Windows Update service from the Service Manager and that would halt this process. However, you wouldn’t be able to update Windows and could miss crucial security updates.

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The procedure to disable the Windows Update service is as follows:

Press Win + R to open the Run window and type the command services.msc. Press Enter to open the Service Manager window. services

In the Service Manager window, scroll to the Windows Update service and right-click on it. Select Properties. Windows update properties

In the Properties window, change the Startup type to Disabled. Click on Apply and then on OK to save the settings.

Change the Startup type to Disabled

Restart the system.

Alternatively, you could change the Startup type to Manual. By doing so, you would have to update Windows manually every time preferably when the system is idle.

2. Set the Internet to run as a metered connection

You could modify the settings for the Windows Update service to run manually, but a better method would be to set the Internet as a metered connection. Doing so would change a few settings on the system known to cause high CPU usage to manual. The procedure to set the Internet to run as a metered connection is as follows:

Click on the Start button and then on the gear-like symbol to open the Settings menu.

Start settings

In the Settings menu, go to Network and Internet >> Wi-Fi.

Now click on the name of the wireless network to open its settings.

Click on the name of the wireless network to open its settings

Scroll to the option Set as metered connection and change the switch to ON.

Set as metered connection

Check if it helps in bringing down the CPU usage, else restart the system.

3. Run the Windows Updates troubleshooter

The Windows Updates troubleshooter checks for general issues with Windows updates. In case the updates are taking too long to install, you could consider running the Windows Updates troubleshooter. The procedure to run the Windows Updates troubleshooter is as follows:

Click on the Start button.

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Start button

Then select Settings > Updates & Security > Troubleshoot.

Select the Windows Updates troubleshooter from the list and run it.

Windows update troubleshooter

Restart the system

4. Consider increasing the RAM of the system

Most systems work fine with system processes like Windows Module Installer Worker. I have never faced the issue in discussion till date. If you encountered the problem of high CPU usage by Windows Module Installer Worker, it is probably because your system does not have sufficient RAM to manage all the processes.

The minimum requirement of RAM to run a Windows 10 system is 2GB. However, as soon as you install any third-party software on the system, it would slow down the computer. Also, heavy processes like the Windows Module Installer Worker would hang the computer. The ideal RAM size required for the smooth functioning of a Windows 10 system is 4GB.

You could also restart your system in clean boot mode to check what all processes are impacting the CPU usage. The procedure to restart your system in clean boot state is as follows:

Press Win + R to open the Run window and type the command msconfig.

msconfig

Press Enter to open the System Configuration window.

In the General tab, select the radio button at Selective startup.

Now, check the checkboxes for check the Load System Services and Use Original boot configuration (in some systems, it might be checked and greyed out so the user cannot change the setting) uncheck the box for Load Startup Items.

Selective startup

Now, open the Services tab and check the checkboxes for Hide all Microsoft services. This will exclude necessary Microsoft services from the list.

Click on Disable all. Hit Apply and then OK to save the settings. Restart the system.

Clean boot system

If it shows high CPU usage despite restarting the system in the clean boot mode, you could consider increasing the RAM of the system.

5. Run a System File Checker scan

One of the causes behind the issue could be missing or corrupt Windows Update files. This would be verified and corrected through an SFC scan. The procedure to run an SFC scan is as follows:

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Search for Command Prompt in the Windows search bar and right-click on the option. Select Run as administrator.

Run Command Prompt as administrator

In the elevated Command Prompt window type the command sfc /scannow and press Enter.

SFC scannow

Wait for the scan to complete. It would need some time. Then restart the system.

6. Rename the Software Distribution folder

When Windows downloads updates, they are initially download to the SoftwareDistribution folder and then installed. However, even if a single file in the SoftwareDistribution folder is corrupt, the Windows updates won’t install. However, once the update is initiated, the Windows Module Installer Worker won’t cease till the updates are complete, which doesn’t happen if a file is corrupt.

To resolve the problem, you could delete the SoftwareDistribution folder and restart the system. This will force the system to download the Windows updates again, and hopefully this time the files won’t be corrupt. You would need to stop the Windows Update service prior to deleting the SoftwareDistribution folder.

Press Win + R to open the Run window and type the command services.msc. Press Enter to open the Service Manager window. services

In the Service Manager window, locate the Windows Update service. Right-click on it and select Stop.

Now, open C:\Windows\ in the File Explorer window.

Delete the SoftwareDistribution folder from the list.

Delete SoftwareDistribution folder

Restart the system.

Learn about $WINDOWS.~BT and if you can delete its content or not.

We hope the solutions provided in this article will help you to stop facing high CPU usage due to Windows Module Installer Worker process on Windows 10.

Check out our other guides to fix high CPU and Disk usage due to Dismhost.exe, Modern Setup Host.

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